Inn the News * Columbus Alive

http://www.columbusalive.com/entertainment/20170419/buxton-inn The Buxton Inn Wednesday Posted Apr 19, 2017 at 6:05 PM Ghosts of cats and cigar-smoking former owners haunt the long-running Granville tavern By Jim Fischer Assistant Editor Jennifer Valenzuela switched on the lights in The Tavern, the downstairs former speakeasy that is now an informal dining/bar space at Granville’s Buxton Inn (and also once a space for stagecoach drivers to bed down on a straw pile while their charges spent the night in one of the Inn’s well-appointed rooms). Within 10 seconds, a glass slid off a counter onto the floor of the previously unoccupied room. “That kind of thing happens all the time,” said Valenzuela, co-owner of the Buxton with other members of her family since 2014. The Buxton Inn has been a continuously running inn and tavern since it was built in 1812. “It’s always been operated as an inn and a tavern. It was a stop on the stagecoach line — the last stop for those traveling west before Columbus. There was always a warm meal, spirits to warm your insides and a comfortable place to rest.” Many of its owners were colorful, and some of them, it’s said, are still hanging around. Thus spirits of one kind or another have helped tell the story of the Buxton Inn throughout its 200-plus-year history. “They all left somewhat of an impression here,” Valenzuela said, adding that the inn’s resident ghosts offer “nothing haunting or evilor bad — more just mischievous or interesting.” Orrin Granger, one of a group of settlers from Granville, Massachusetts who helped found Granville, Ohio, built the structure in 1812, calling it, simply, The Tavern. Among the...

The Buxton Inn, where it has been and where it is going

In the village of Granville there is a unique part of American history called the Buxton Inn.  Over the last 200 years many people have visited, eaten a meal, and stayed overnight at the Inn.  Some people have been more notable then others, like Harriet Beecher Stowe, Yo-Yo Ma, and yes, even President Abraham Lincoln.  The Buxton was an early stagecoach stop, saw the War of 1812, and was part of the Underground Railroad.  The history is intriguing and the future is exciting. The Inn was purchased from the long time owners, Orville and Audrey Orr in December of 2014.  As the new owners, we have been working continuously on renovating all 25 guest rooms, undergoing a major restaurant overhaul and developing event space.  The look and the feel of the Buxton Inn has changed all the while preserving its past. The setup of the Inn is distinctive because the 25 guest rooms are spread out between the main inn and 4 historic homes; also each room has a different layout and style.  The houses span almost the whole village block on the corner of Broadway and Pearl Street.  You can pick to stay in the main inn, in one of the original guest rooms or the Warner House that dates back to 1815 or Founders Hall that features mid-19th century architecture or you can stay in the newest home which was purchased right out of the Sears Catalog and built in 1920. As for the restaurant, a major overhaul doesn’t do it justice!  The Buxton is now open for lunches during the week and is featuring an all-new...
Renovations! Renovations! Renovations!

Renovations! Renovations! Renovations!

A lot of headway has been made here at the Inn since we last blogged.  2 event spaces, 2 dining rooms, and 6 guest rooms have been renovated. 2 king guest suites have been added, 4 buildings have been painted, and a new chef and pastry chef have joined us. Our heads are spinning with all the great things happening here.  We look forward to seeing you here throughout the year to check out the wonderful...